Dancing while in Labor? How awesome is that?!?!?

I saw this video and had to share.  This woman is 7 centimeters dilated and is freaking dancing!!!  This is how big 7 centimeters is for those of you who are not familiar.

7 centimeters

7 centimeters

When a woman is 7 centimeters she is in what is called transition.  Transition is aside from the actual birth one of the most intense portions of labor.  Here is a detailed definition of transition:

“Transition is the most difficult phase of labor for most women; however, it is also the shortest phase generally lasting ½ hour to 1½ hours in length.

Physically, mom is experiencing contractions 2-3 minutes apart, lasting 60-90 seconds, and are very strong in intensity. Contractions may even “piggy-back” which means one contraction may start to fade away and another one comes along immediately. During this phase she may notice increased bloody show; nausea, vomiting, burping, or hiccups; shaking; hot/cold feelings; fatigue; and sensitivity to touch. Additionally, she may indicate increased pressure on the perineum and/or rectum.

Emotionally, mom can become restless, irritable, discouraged, and confused. She may find that she focuses inward as she works with her labor. She may have a hard time communicating her wishes. This is the point in labor when she usually needs the most support.

During transition, labor support is crucial for the mom’s physical and emotional well-being. Partners should remain with the mom; give firm, clear, positive, and simple directions; remind her to change her positions; assist with breathing patterns; offer a cool washcloth for her brow and lip balm; and keep her hydrated with water and/or ice chips. Remind her to take one contraction at a time and not to give in to the panicky feelings. If Mom Panics: call her by name, take her face in your hands, develop and maintain eye contact, breathe with mom or talk her through the contraction, try variations in breathing patterns, and give lots of reassurance that she is near the end! Remember, any questions for mom should be asked BETWEEN contractions and not during. Watch for signs that she has to push (grunting or pushing sounds). If she indicates she needs to push, tell her to lift up her chin and pretend she is blowing out birthday candles one by one. She needs to be checked by her caregiver to see if her cervix is completely dilated. If not and she pushes prematurely, her cervix could swell or tear.”

Now, with that knowledge in mind, these brave men took on a labor simulator to experience what their wives felt.  Imagine trying to dance through this!

This was me at 7 centimeters.  I had a playlist planed and I had full intent on dancing and singing my way through birth.  I was going to push and actually spit the kid out while Yellow by Coldplay was playing.  Needless to say NONE of that happened.  When the man tried to put music on I very passionately let him know that he need not do anything but figure out how to make my labor pains go away and prevent me from spontaneously combusting.

this is me curled up in a ball trying to figure out how to calmly get this baby out. No dancing.

this is me curled up in a ball trying to figure out how to calmly get this baby out. No dancing.

Dancing is actually a great way to lessen the labor pains.  There are all sorts of ways to lessen labor pains, the issue becomes when you are actually in labor you are in too much pain to do any of them.  My doula and midwife deserve medals.  Without them I’m sure I would have ran naked through the hospital looking for drugs.

God bless this woman!  You go girl!

Birth Stories – The story of Adrian

I decided to start doing birth stories to promote understanding and tolerance for all birth methods.  I also wanted for us to bask in the sheer beauty of bringing the life into the world.  This is the story of the birth of Adrian.

Beautiful Adrian

Beautiful Adrian

For as long as I can remember I’ve always had a cycle that was so regular I could set my watch to it so only two days after my monthly friend didn’t make her arrival I knew before I snuck out of my cube and down the street to Target for a pregnancy test that I was going to be a mother for the first time. Truth be told knowing is one thing and seeing is another and when those two lines confirmed what I already knew I rode up the elevator with my thoughts all over the place wondering what turn my life was about to take. I mumbled over some excuse and got out of working that day. I’ll never forget that day, it was February 14.
Just a few days after that positive pregnancy test I turned 26, and while the pregnancy wasn’t planned we were engaged and planning for a wedding that November that we ended up cancelling. Finding it more financially responsible we decided to exchange our vows in front of a judge and a few friends at the Dekalb county courthouse on a random day in September.
I didn’t do anything special in preparation for D-day, other than making sure I ate well, and took care of myself. My pregnancy was perfect. I had heard of C-sections but never paid much attention because as dumb as it sounds, I was under the impression that it was something that applied to older women, not women just past the threshold of their mid twenties.
October 13, 2005 I went to the hospital thinking my water had broken only to have it really break in the waiting room all over the floor while filling out my paperwork. I should’ve known then things weren’t going to go as planned. It was a full moon and I nearly had to wait an hour to get a room. Once I finally made it to my room I labored naturally for nearly 6 hours before I was told that I was only at 2 cm. My doctor told me that I had a few options, I could continue to labor through the night or she could take the baby via C-section before she left the hospital for the evening.
I chose the prior I labored the rest of the night med free, and when she returned to check me in the morning I was only at 5cm. Then all hell broke loose. She explained to me that the baby had meconium and although they had given me a catheter, I was starting to run a fever and she feared the cord was around the baby’s neck based on his heart rate and she just didn’t want me to continue on much longer. She gave me another 3 hours to progress and when I barely moved another centimeter I knew there was no more buying time.
I just remember lying there, staring at the ceiling and crying hysterically with my tears running into my ears and wetting the side of the pillow while a rush of doctors and nurses rushed in consoling me and taking my temperature and sticking me and telling me that because the baby had meconium I wouldn’t see him right away because he would be whisked off to the NICU for observation and bright lights and my husband not being there as he got scrubbed it all seemed to happen so quickly that I didn’t have the time question anything.
October 14, at 10:42a my son was born, with the cord wrapped around his neck 3 times. He was fine, I wasn’t fine, but he was and that’s all that mattered. In excruciating pain I kept telling the nurses something wasn’t right and again like a tidal wave after I mentioned blood was trickling it was like déjà vu with a rush of nurses pushing on my stomach trying to stop the bleeding. Again, I lay there with no words just tears, all alone because my mother and husband had gone to see about my son. To have had such a perfect pregnancy, my birth story was a nightmare.
I’m not sure if there was anything I would change, other than educating myself more on C-sections prior to being rushed talked through one while getting prepped. I trusted my doctor and at the mention that my child might have had a cord around his neck as much as I didn’t want to, I was fine with the C-section. I just remember wanting to get him here safely and if that was the only way then that was the way. He’s a happy healthy 9 year old just like other happy healthy 9 year olds that may have made their entrance into the world via other birthing options. I believe the method by which we enter this world is nothing compared to what we do while we’re here.
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thing compared to what we do while we’re here.
Blog: http://www.lipglossandbinky.com
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/glossymimi
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/glossymimi
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/LipglossandBinky
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/MommyScarlett